HeartStart Preschool

HeartStart Preschool

HeartStart Preschool approaches teaching toddlers and preschoolers from a long-term perspective of educating the whole child. Each lesson is organized into active learning segments that address your child’s natural mental, physical, emotional, and spiritual development.

We create learning experiences that build on academic concepts. We eat colors to learn colors, build with shapes to learn shapes, sing numbers to learn numbers, read books to learn a lot of things, and play games just to have fun. If you want your preschooler to read on a kindergarten level by age 4, this is not the preschool for you. But if you want to give your child experiences that develop a strong foundation for lifelong learning, then HeartStart is it!

Too many parents feel too much anxiety about their preschooler’s reading level, and then they worry whether their child is lagging behind academic “norms” throughout early elementary school. Research data shows that normal development varies widely among children and that an early academic emphasis does not produce long-term benefits. Actually, the opposite holds true. A focus on reading at ages 3–5 does not necessarily develop superior readers. Any advantage children gain through preschool academics tends to disappear in early elementary school—sometimes in kindergarten [1]. On the other hand, higher childhood levels of anxiety may remain as compared to non-preschooled peers [2].

So relax, have fun, and don’t sweat it! Your child is going to learn the academic basics—when they’re ready. Don’t feel pressured to push them to do something they’re not ready to do. There are so many stress-free, wonderful things you can do to build a strong foundation of learning, happiness, and confidence. HeartStart Preschool will show you how.


[1] Lisa N. Hickman, “Who Should Care for Our Children? The Effects of Home Versus Center Care on Child Cognition and Social Adjustment,” Journal of Family Issues 27 (May 2006): 652-684.

[2] Darcy Olsen and Jennifer Martin, “Assessing Proposals for Preschool and Kindergarten: Essential Information for Parents, Taxpayers, and Policymakers,” Goldwater Institute, Policy Report No. 201, 2005.